STAB52 Introduction to Probability

(Fall 2018)

 

Instructor: Mahinda Samarakoon

Email: mahinda@utsc.utoronto.ca

Office: IC442

Office hours: See Quercus Course page

 

 

Course Description

 

STAB52 is a mathematical treatment of probability. In this course we discuss the mathematics that underlies most statistical methodology. The topics covered include: the probability model, density and distribution functions, computer generation of random variables, conditional probability, expectation, sampling distributions, weak law of large numbers, central limit theorem, Monte Carlo methods, Markov chains, Poisson processes, simulation, and applications

 

Content, emphasis, etc. of the course is defined by means of the lecture material - not only the textbook. It is important to attend all lectures, as there is normally no simple way to make up for missed lectures (perhaps obtain another student's notes). There will also be many lecture examples using R statistical software, which students will be using.

 

 

Textbook: Probability and Statistics: The Science of Uncertainty by Michael J. Evans and Jeffrey S. Rosenthal, 2nd edition,

 

Some useful Links

 

Registrar's office (Exam schedule)

Where are my lectures and tutorials?

CMS Department

UTSC webpage

University of Toronto Homepage

English Language Development Centre, Centre for Teaching and Learning

R Homepage

 

R Studio Homepage

 

Solutions for Assigns

 

Solutions for assignment 1

 

 

 

Announcements

 

 

Aids allowed for the Midterm Test

 

1)     A non-communicating, non-programmable calculator, Note: phone calculators or any other communicating devices are NOT allowed during the test.

2)     You are allowed to bring one letter-sized (8.5 x 11) cheat sheet, handwritten by you. You may use both sides if you wish. On your cheat sheet, you may write anything that helps. No more than one sheet will be allowed, even if only side is written. We provide any statistical tables (such as standard normal) that you might need.

 

 

Aids allowed for the Final Exam

 

1)     A non-communicating, non-programmable calculator, Note: phone calculators or any other communicating devices are NOT allowed during the test.

2)     You are allowed to bring two letter-sized (8.5 x 11) cheat sheets, handwritten by you. You may use both sides if you wish. On your cheat sheet, you may write anything that helps. No more than two sheets will be allowed, even if only side is written. We provide any statistical tables (such as standard normal) that you might need.

 

 

Communicating devices

 

The students are allowed to use the textbook/class notes and a calculator during the quizzes. However communicating devices such as cell phones, iPads, laptops are not allowed.

This means phone calculators, notes in iPads, laptops are not allowed during quizzes/test/exam.

 

 

 

ACCESSABILITY STATEMENT

 

Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In particular, if you have a disability/health consideration that may require accommodations, please feel free to approach me and/or the AccessAbility Services Office as soon as possible. I will work with you and AccessAbility Services to ensure you can achieve your learning goals in this course. Enquiries are confidential. The UTSC AccessAbility Services staff (located in S302) are available by appointment to assess specific needs, provide referrals and arrange appropriate accommodations (416) 287-7560 or ability@utsc.utoronto.ca.

 

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY STATEMENT

 

Academic integrity is essential to the pursuit of learning and scholarship in a university, and to ensuring that a degree from the University of Toronto is a strong signal of each student's individual academic achievement. As a result, the University treats cases of cheating and plagiarism very seriously. The University of Toronto's Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters (http://www.governingcouncil.utoronto.ca/policies/behaveac.htm) outlines the behaviours that constitute academic dishonesty and the processes for addressing academic offences. Potential offences include, but are not limited to:

 

IN PAPERS AND ASSIGNMENTS: Using someone else's ideas or words without appropriate acknowledgement. Submitting your own work in more than one course without the permission of the instructor. Making up sources or facts. Obtaining or providing unauthorized assistance on any assignment.

 

ON TESTS AND EXAMS: Using or possessing unauthorized aids. Looking at someone else's answers during an exam or test. Misrepresenting your identity.

 

IN ACADEMIC WORK: Falsifying institutional documents or grades. Falsifying or altering any documentation required by the University, including (but not limited to) doctor's notes. All suspected cases of academic dishonesty will be investigated following procedures outlined in the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters. If you have questions or concerns about what constitutes appropriate academic behaviour or appropriate research and citation methods, you are expected to seek out additional information on academic integrity from your instructor or from other institutional resources (see http://www.utoronto.ca/academicintegrity/resourcesfor students.html).